PHI Thieves Are Usually After Financial Information

Now that many physicians and other healthcare organizations are purchasing and utilizing EMRs, they seem to be focused on safeguarding the clinical Protected Health Information (PHI) of their patients. In the process, some are forgetting to protect patient financial information even though it is also PHI.

The FierceHealthIT newsletter of October 24, 2012 indicates that healthcare system data thieves are usually after financial information.

Despite reports of efforts to blackmail patients and the possibility of hacking pacemakers, healthcare data breaches in the end are similar to other cyber crimes, according to a new report from Verizon. In an examination of approximately 60 confirmed data breaches over the past two years, the report concludes that those who attack healthcare systems primarily look for information from which they can make a profit.

According to this Verizon report, point-of-sale systems (credit card machines) and desktop and laptop computers are the most common points of breach. Thieves attack the weakest links in the payment chain. Rather than going after your server, they hack into peripheral equipment that can get them access to this financial information.

Here at SOS, we harp on the need to secure the data in your billing and clinical record software. We have been amazed at the lack of awareness of even our largest customers. Every week, we receive emails that contain PHI or a direct way to get to PHI. Employees of behavioral health organizations often do not realize that sending an email with PHI in it is like sending a postcard with the same information. Anyone who sees that postcard and who knows how to read can take a look at your message. The same is true with insecure, unencrypted email. Anyone who knows how to do so and who has any interest can take a look at your email.

This study indicated that, among the breaches they studied, most of the incidents occurred at businesses that had from one to one hundred employees.

The simple solution….encrypt all PHI while it is resting on your system and while it is in transit from one place to another. If you don’t know how to do that, learn how, now!

Please share your experiences, direct or indirect, with safeguarding PHI. Do you encrypt? What procedures has your organization developed to assure that all of the PHI in your possession is as safe as possible from thieves?

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